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Your most recent viewing of a Brosnan outing


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#1 Tiin007

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 03:11 PM

As it seems those "revisiting" threads have mostly been deleted (cleaning up the forums?), I thought it would be a good idea to start a thread wherein we share our thoughts after our most recent viewings of any of the Brosnan outings. One thread for all of Brosnan's films seems like a better idea to me than one thread per film. So feel free to share your recent experiences with a Brosnan installment, or to respond to the experiences of others. 

 

DIE ANOTHER DAY

 

Despite my love for the series, it's been a while since I've seen a Bond film. Other than SPECTRE (which I've seen five times, most recently in April), it must have been last October when I last saw a Bond movie. So this was long overdue. 

 

As I've said in the past, Die Another Day is significantly better than common perception would lead one to believe. Internet group think can be a b*tch, and in the case of Brosnan's final donning of the tux it's to the film's detriment. I'm almost always pleasantly surprised by this outing (despite its setbacks), and this time was no different.

 

The good:

-The entire North Korea sequence and it's immediate aftermath were top notch, and put a nice spin on the Bond formula. Not only was Brosnan's ability to convey vulnerability superb, but the dialogue was all around well written. Arnold's score complements these scenes wonderfully. 

- A disheveled Bond walking into the hotel in Hong Kong. A personal favorite of mine.

- Brosnan and Dench's rapport. These two have progressed from their initial hesitancy towards one another in GE, and I think now was the perfect time to explore the matter of trust in their relationship. "If I'd had my way, you'd still be in North Korea." 

- Cuba was a nice setting, and we got to experience the locale more fully than we did in GE. 

- The sword fight. 

- John Cleese. Okay, I know this may be somewhat controversial, but I actually think Cleese did a really good job in this one. His Q may have been a bit too similar to the way Desmond played the role, but the character was miles better than the buffoon from TWINE (Smithers from FYEO and OP was a better model for what Q's assistant should be). And Brosnan and Cleese seemed to be a good match. 

- Rosamund Pike as Miranda Frost. 

- The Ice Palace was a good idea in theory. 

- Pierce Brosnan really shines in this one. His vulnerable side in GE, TND, and TWINE felt a bit forced and overacted, but here it felt organic. He was able to pull off both the vulnerable and fun aspects of the character in the same film without it feeling disjointed or all over the place (I'm referring to Brosnan's acting specifically, not the film as a whole). I will forever maintain that this was Brosnan's finest performance of his four. 

 

 

The bad:

- Gustav Graves. Everything about this character makes me cringe. His dialogue is bloated and exaggerated, and Toby Stephens' acting could use a lot of work. Maybe, just maybe one could argue that some of these issues were merely Colonel Moon behaving as he thought the British do, but I find such a reading to be overly generous. Graves felt like a caricature of what a Bond villain should be, and is (in my humble opinion) the worst villain in the entire franchise. I can forgive the film for many of its other flaws, but it is Gustav Graves which really brings Die Another Day down for me. 

- The second half. This has been discussed ad nauseum, so I'll simply say that I agree with the general consensus about the film losing its way halfway through. It's as if the film making team used up all of their creative energy on the first half and then descended into self-parody. The dialogue in particular took a huge plunge around the halfway mark (I actually very much liked the dialogue in the first half). 

- Halle Berry. 

- Icarus was too over the top, as was Bond's escaping it in Graves' vehicle. 

- The CGI parasurfing through the ice waves.

- The finale on the plane felt a little underwhelming, particularly as the fight between Bond and Graves paled in comparison to Jinx vs. Miranda. And Graves' Force Lightning Suit was a bit much, as was the escape on the helicopter (I'm not even sure if that would work per the laws of physics).

- The entire Virtual Reality subplot was simply not needed. It added nothing to the plot, and felt more like filler than anything else. I'd have preferred these scenes to have been removed entirely. 

 

Final thoughts:

While Die Another Day will likely never crack my top ten, it is far from the worst entry in the series. Brosnan is on top form, and the first half of the film may be one of the longest stretches of greatness in any Bond film. Bond's imprisonment in North Korea was a nice addition to Bond lore, and was handled very well. But it is Graves and the over-the-top nature of the second half that pulls down this one. 

 

Some trivia for you-- this is one of only two Bond films featuring both Bond and Moneypenny wherein the two never interact (kudos to plankattack for pointing out LTK as the other one). 



#2 David_M

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 06:23 PM

Yes, but let's sum up just the stuff you did NOT like:

 

- The villain

- The Bond girl

- The final battle

- The entire second half of the film

 

To me that represents an very large percentage of what matters to a Bond film; large enough that I feel comfortable writing off the film as an epic fail.  For you, that's not the case, and that's cool, but I think you'll agree that by any objective standard the list of things that did not work is not only long, but comprised of some of the most crucial elements of the entire formula.

 

And again, the worst part of the VR sequences is that the writers have no concept of what VR even IS.  It is NOT "put on these goggles and anything you imagine will seem more real."  Unless Q Branch created a simulation where Bond and Moneypenny make out, there is no way Moneypenny could've experienced that scenario when she put the headgear on. Easily one of the  most idiotic scenes in the series, which let's face it is saying something.



#3 Tiin007

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 06:58 PM

I hear you, David_M.

 

I think what keeps DAD from being my least favorite, though, is all the good I mentioned. Those moments really did shine for me. Compare the film to, say, TMWTGG, which on a good day is plain and boring, and on a bad day just feels off. Other than perhaps Lee's performance, I can't really think of anything positive to say about TMWTGG-- even if its negatives are less offensive than those of DAD. 

 

DAD took a number of risks, many of which paid off, and many of which fell flat on their face. A part of me would rather have a Bond film with outstanding moments (such as DAD) than a Bond film which is wholly forgettable in its blandness (such as TMWTGG). 

 

And I totally agree with your point about the VR sequence. 



#4 Simon

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 10:27 PM

Losing the fight to contribute to this thread due to it being considered an exercise in redundancy - not because the question is not valid but simply because IT has been answered in many years past - I once again put nose to grindstone.

 

That said, before pitching forth, I do think there should be some mechanism in place to track 'How Simon thought about film X in years Film Year / Film Year plus 5, Film Year plus 10 etc etc.  Time does change stuff.

 

Coming to the conclusion before the evidence is proffered, DAD will, in time, be considered the way Moonraker is considered today.  A singular exercise in flamboyance that will, as part of the full canon, demonstrate the ebb and flow of the Bond universe over the course of 'a long time'.  in exactly the same way that the world goes through its Boom and Bust years, in hindsight, all makes sense.

 

That said, in 2016, 14 years after the event, for me, Brosnan was at his most relaxed and supremely arrogant, the captivity angle was ingenious and the fact the story continued through the titles was efficiently inventive.  If Moonraker is now to be celebrated, then in the same vein, I celebrate DAD - except for the kite surfing and the slightly comic book fighting at the end where they are debating each other's raison d'etre while fighting for their lives.

 

DAD is entertaining.  My problem to this day is TWODDLE, which is definitely Not entertaining, and commits the cardinal sin of actually being boring.



#5 Tiin007

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 10:33 PM

TWODDLE? Do you mean TWINE?



#6 plankattack

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:45 PM

Some trivia for you-- this is the only Bond film featuring both Bond and Moneypenny wherein the two never interact.


LTK? Someone help me out (I do not currently feel the desire - as much as I like LTK - to sit through it to be sure.....). Was cconvinced that Bliss and TD do not share a scene :)

#7 Tiin007

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:56 PM

 

Some trivia for you-- this is the only Bond film featuring both Bond and Moneypenny wherein the two never interact.


LTK? Someone help me out (I do not currently feel the desire - as much as I like LTK - to sit through it to be sure.....). Was cconvinced that Bliss and TD do not share a scene :)

 

 

You are absolutely correct! My mistake. Thanks for pointing that out. (Edited my initial post to reflect that.)



#8 David_M

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 02:29 AM

@Tiin007:

 

I think I actually like DAD less *because* it's not wall-to-wall awful.  In fact, it starts out very promisingly, and THEN goes in the crapper.  Consequently, it's maybe the only Bond film to actually make me angry.  I agree TMWTGG doesn't have much going for it (though some fans love it), but it's the kind of disappointment I'm used to in this series: another uninspired and unengaging time-filler with the occasional bright spot (though not TOO bright, in this case).  DAD on the other hand promised, briefly, to be something special.  In the end it felt like the producers were dangling the carrot in front of us for 45 minutes, only to bash us with the stick for the remaining hour and a half.

 

It's hard to give DAD credit for "taking risks" because what few it took (Bond on the outs with MI-6, Bond in prison for 14 months, Bond on his own with nothing but a vintage car and an equally vintage revolver) are undone on the turn of a dime as we're thrown into a formula entry made up of one ham-fisted homage (read: theft) after another with invisible cars, amateurish CGI, a "science" plot written by the scientifically ignorant and the worst Bond girl of all time.  The second half (plus) of the film is such a complete and total retreat into safe, tested, been-there, done-that (only not this OTT) territory that I'd call it, frankly, gutless.

 

I'm not at all sure DAD will be re-assessed one day as a great entry, but I will agree that what was good the first time I saw it is still, mostly, good.  But at 45 minutes, it's the shortest Bond movie I watch, on the rare occasions I pop it in.



#9 RedsBaron

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 04:25 PM

I agree with David_M. For its first 45 minutes or so DAD was decent. It fell apart after that.  



#10 dtuba

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 10:08 PM

TWODDLE? Do you mean TWINE?

I think he had it right the first time.



#11 Grard Bond

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 11:38 AM

The difference is Moonraker was mostly loved when it was released, DaD wasn't.



#12 S K Y F A L L

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 11:33 PM

I like watching the series in order now so it would have been DAD, we could go all day about DAD see 'greatest Bond film ever' thread.



#13 billy007

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 04:51 AM

I re watch TWINE on a regular basis. As I've posted before I feel that if an actor portrays 007 3x or more His third outing is his best.

 

Sir Sean- Goldfinger  Still remains the blueprint of the series to this day.

Sir Roger-Spy Who Loved Me-  Demonstrated 007's killer instinct and his sensitive side. The look he gave Anya when she mentioned Tracy was deadlier than a 7.65 mm round.

 

Pierce Brosnan- TWINE   2nd best PTS in series(not quite as good as Goldfinger but close)  The look of disgust on 007's face when he has to deal with the henchmen in the banker's office.  The pillow talk with Electra and finally his best scene in all four of his movies  "i never miss"   BANG!

 

I would have loved to have seen PB do Casino Royale as a period piece.



#14 Tiin007

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 02:19 AM

TOMORROW NEVER DIES

 

For my birthday last week, my wife and I watched this (now) classic Bond adventure. Unlike some of Brosnan's other films (GE in particular), this one really stood the test of time, and is without a doubt my favorite of his four. Whereas Die Another Day may be the most underrated Brosnan film (see my review above), Tomorrow Never Dies is probably the least discussed, as it is the most unobtrusive of the bunch. 

 

The good:

-The plot. A modern adaptation of what worked so well in YOLT and TSWLM. 

-Elliot Carver. For years now, Carver has been my favorite villain of the entire series. He may not be the best in any objective sense, but it is immensely enjoyable to watch Pryce revel in his portrayal of the overly ambitious media mogul. His scene in Vietnam with the captured Bond and Wai-Lin is my personal favorite moment of his, but he really lights up the entire picture. It's been said that a Bond film is only as great as its villain, and here such a barometer has turned the film into a classic. Also noteworthy is that Carver received a high dose of screen time, which is way more than can be said of some of the recent Bond villains. 

-The Bond girls. While neither quite hit the height of Natalya from GE, both do a more than adequate job, and are infinitely better than the remaining Bond girls of the Brosnan era. Wai-Lin was also the most believable "Bond's equal" the series may have given us. 

-The henchmen. GE's henchmen set a very high bar. Thankfully, Gupta, Stamper, and Kaufman lived up to their predecessors, equaling them in variety and menace without being carbon copies. Stamper belongs alongside Red Grant and Necros in the physical department, and Gupta's understated personality really grounds the group. Kaufman's short scene, though, has always been a highlight for me; never has a henchmen in the series achieved so much with so little screen time. 

-The car. Remote control was a nice customization for 90s Bond, and is now perfectly within the realm of reality. The other tricks in the car were also a good addition to the Bond vehicular canon. 

-The finale. Many have complained about the over-the-top nature of the shootout aboard the stealth-ship. While I see where they are coming from, for me there is something deeply entertaining about the pair's assault on Carver's headquarters. Whereas GE's finale centered on the more personal combat of Bond vs. Trevelyan, TND's was unabashed badassery. Brosnan with the rocket launcher and the Bond theme blasting is the perfect example of this. 

-Judi Dench's M stayed where she belongs: in London. 

-The antagonistic relationship between M and Admiral Roebuck. Adds an exciting layer to the plot, and helps define Bond's place in the complex world of British intelligence. 

-The score. I used to dislike Arnold's inaugural effort. While it definitely isn't his best contribution to the series, I really enjoyed it this time out. 

-The PTS. May be my personal favorite in the series. Does an incredible job at building tension. Truly exhilarating. 

 

The bad: 

-The DB5. I get why it was brought back in GE. Bond needed to be reestablished after the six year hiatus, and it also served to underscore that he really was "a relic of the Cold War." But its inclusion in TND was nothing more than shallow lip service to the fans. (Granted, the Craig era's overuse of the vehicle may have soured my thoughts on this, which had never bothered me in the past.) 

-The motorcycle chase was a bit too long. Nowhere near as problematic as the absurdly protracted boat chase in LALD, but the bike chase could have been trimmed a bit and still achieved its intended affect. Sometimes less is more. 

-The lack of breathing space, particularly in the second half. Clocking in at under two hours, TND is one of the shorter entries in the series, which makes its wall-to-wall action feel a bit much at times. Some more characterization scenes (like the brilliant one at Carver's launch party) would have helped elevate the film to iconic status, as these bits which are already in the film were done brilliantly. 

-Paris Carver should have been Sylvia Trench Carver. A nitpick, but would've been significantly better fan service than the DB5, and would have deepened her character. "How about the words 'I'll be right back'?" [...] "Something always came up." 

 

Final thoughts:

Far and away the most neglected Brosnan outing, Tomorrow Never Dies succeeds in providing us with a classic Bond adventure in the modern age. While it may not be the best entry since BB and MGW took over as producers (that prize goes to CR), it is the only one of their eight films which properly delivers a traditional Bond film (too many of the others either messed with the formula or felt like pastiche). I have very few quibbles with this movie, and it was nice to see a modern Bond movie that is not deeply personal. Whereas CR should serve as a tonal template for future films, I think TND should serve as a model for how to make a non-personal modern Bond adventure. I really never tire of this one. 

 

Some trivia for you-- Elliot Carver is the only Bond villain I can think of with a spouse. Can you think of any other examples from the film series? 



#15 billy007

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 06:11 AM

PB's hotel scene. He's in a tux shirt,he's wearing the shoulder holster, he pours a drink. He's prepared and waiting for whoever/whatever comes through that door.

The beginning of the "politically correct era"  Sir Sean would have lit a Morland's.



#16 Simon

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 08:39 AM

I recently had my 50th birthday party in that hotel room.  It is actually called the Ballroom at the venue.

 

Stoke Park, all black tied with ~50 guests.  A wonderful venue for the above connection, and of course Goldfinger, and, if you pop into the village, the graveyard scene in FYEO.



#17 sharpshooter

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 09:06 AM

PB's hotel scene. He's in a tux shirt,he's wearing the shoulder holster, he pours a drink. He's prepared and waiting for whoever/whatever comes through that door.

The beginning of the "politically correct era"  Sir Sean would have lit a Morland's.

Great scene, though. Fans all have different thoughts, and it's an opinion business. But I think Brosnan is too hard on himself, especially when comparing his take to Daniel Craig's level of grit and intensity. Brosnan's strengths lie elsewhere. I think he represented the brand well. He had the look and the special 'Bond' aura. He did fine. 



#18 Tiin007

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 11:44 AM

I recently had my 50th birthday party in that hotel room.  It is actually called the Ballroom at the venue.

 

Does the room still look like it did in TND, Simon? Or has it been renovated and is hardly recognizable to us fans now? 

 

 

 

PB's hotel scene. He's in a tux shirt,he's wearing the shoulder holster, he pours a drink. He's prepared and waiting for whoever/whatever comes through that door.

The beginning of the "politically correct era"  Sir Sean would have lit a Morland's.

Great scene, though. Fans all have different thoughts, and it's an opinion business. But I think Brosnan is too hard on himself, especially when comparing his take to Daniel Craig's level of grit and intensity. Brosnan's strengths lie elsewhere. I think he represented the brand well. He had the look and the special 'Bond' aura. He did fine. 

 

 

I liked this scene as well. Sometimes it's the simple, understated moments which really make a character / movie. It's scenes like this which need to be kept even in the hopeful event EON drops the deeply personal angles. Same with Bond cleaning himself up and looking in the mirror after the stairwell fight in CR. Great characterization: really humanizes Bond. 

 

And I know what you mean about Brosnan having "the look and the special 'Bond' aura." Having grown up with Brosnan in the role, he really oozes Bond to me, and will forever remain my Bond. Unlike some fans, I count Brosnan's amalgamation of the other actors to his credit; in many ways, he took the best aspects that each of his predecessors had to offer. 



#19 Dustin

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 02:39 PM

Brosnan was exactly what audiences wanted in the 90s of Bond. This had its pros and cons, the imagery often tended to strive for iconic moments, the plots became less involving the more the action veered into show terrain. But whatever one may think of Brosnan's approach, he kept Bond in business during that time.

#20 David_M

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 08:04 PM

I also liked TND best of Brosnan's outings.  It's certainly the least pretentious, and for the most part seems comfortable being what it is: a straight up action flic.  Brosnan was at his best here, too, I think.  To me, he seemed to be trying to hard in GE, like he's thinking, "I know I'm pretty, folks, but look, I can be tough, too."  In TND, with the b.o. success of GE behind him, he seems much more relaxed, and that translates on screen to the kind of cool confidence the role requires.  Brosnan's scenes with Q in this one are probably the best they did together, and having the "briefing from M" happen in a moving vehicle was a nice change and worked well with the overall "never stop moving" approach of the film.

 

Some of the action scenes are patently absurd, but what else is new.  Also Carver's schemes make no sense whatsoever, but what the heck, he is crazy after all.  Also, I like Wai-Lin, but I never sense any chemistry between her and Bond.  In fact when they go for the kiss at the end, I remember thinking, "Wait, what?  They're into each other?!"  On the whole, though, it's a fun outing, and the only Brosnan entry where I went back for a second viewing during the theatrical release. 



#21 Simon

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 08:34 PM

Hi Tim, yup the room is as per the film.

 

I wonder if a false wall was placed behind the bed as actually, there is a window at that end.

 

Otherwise, the little half moon area where Bond was sat drinking vodka awaiting Paris, and later where Dr Kaufman sat to do his bit were all there.

 

The door that Paris came into the room from, actually leads to the Wyatt Room (which I also had for the party).  And this room brings things neatly into a circle shape as this was where Layer Cake was filmed - which of course starred a future Bond.



#22 S K Y F A L L

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 03:03 AM

Goldeneye is still as great as it ever was, how is there not a thread for this film? Occasionally I'll ask myself how Bond escapes in a tank without being followed by a helicopter but I just go with it and enjoy the ride. I think the directing is as good as ever and the characters are so believable. Famke Janssen / Xenia and Izabella Scorupco / Natalya are still some of my favorite Bond girls. The Q sequence is a little over the top with things blowing up in the background every 5 seconds but they safe it with a joke when Q suggests not to touch that because it is his lunch. Joe Don Baker / Jack Wade is unusual but fun, Sean Bean / Alec Trevelyan is a classic Bond villain IMO and Gottfried John as General Ourumov is believable as he downs that flask under pressure. Even TchĂ©ky Karyo does a great job portraying Defense Minister Dmitri Mishkin as a man with authority. I love how unique Janus'es base in Cuba is. It's real meets the surreal, from being an actual real satellite but not really being raised from the water. I know the sound track isn't that popular around here however I'm still a fan of it and even the ending credits song sung by the compose Eric Serra. 
 
Tomorrow Never Dies was the first Bond film I seen in theaters and I was a little disappointing that it wasn't another Goldeneye however I still found and do find it very entertaining. The PTS is a basic Bond formula yet I still love it and its also the first time we see Charles Robinson. Teri Hatcher is beautiful in this and Michelle Yeoh brings something different to the table. I like the M briefing with the police escort, the Q scenes and gadgets are interesting and I always enjoy the scenes where Bond investigates, finds the encoder and destroys a model satellite in one of Carver's buildings. I find the China scenes exotic specially on Ha Long Bay as the sun sets and David Arnolds score is played. The Stealth Boat finale is great IMO from Bond creating a diversion with a glass jar and grenade, 'I have a back up plan', 'me to', all the way to the fight with Stamper who owes Bond an unpleasant death. First time a Bond film ends on a body water since TSWLM and it works leaving on a high note as Bond safes the day, safes the girl and gets her too. I am not one of those fans who finds the ending credits song better then the title song, however I do enjoy it just not on the level I did as; 'if there was a men', 'if you ask me to' and 'the experience of love.' 
 
The World Is Not Enough has a fun opening sequence how Bond know how long that rope was as he jumped out of a window at the bank I'll never know, could have been 12 feet long. Not long enough. The boat scenes are great as always and I never question anything just enjoy that smooth ride and the music too as techno as it is. I like the MI6 hideout they visit in Scottland, the Bernard Lee painting in the background and the Q scenes are very special. I never like Robert Carlyle as Renard or much of the casting this time around and in DAD. Sophie Marceau as Elektra King, well I'm just glad Bond did what he did and Denise Richards as Dr. Christmas Jones is not who I would ever have cast but I think she does a fine job given that she doesn't belong IMO, to quote her character in the TV show '30 Rock', "Idiots can do anything we put our minds to. I played a nuclear psychiatrist in a James Bonk movie." Charles Robinson is back and guess what he can fly a helicopter too. As for the Gadgets the only one that never impressed me was the inflatable jacket. The plot kinda borrows from GF but it never really bothers me. Robbie Coltrane returns as Valentin Zukovsky which was always a nice surprise and he has some funny dialog. I can't believe M being dragged into the field is a thing now, at the time I thought that was a one off. I think that the third act is probably that best, not by much though. The secret underwater base island (Maiden's Tower) and the nuclear submarine are great settings for a ticking clock scenario. 
 
Die Another Day is film is unusual in the sense that it has one of the best first half's of any film but also one of the worst second half's of the series. I always thought the bullet used during the gun barrel was rather fun for the occasion. The opening surfing sequence was pretty neat and looks stupendous. I might have just went with a traditional title sequence and just do some scenes of Bond getting tortured. I felt the casting was weak and made Brosnan seem old, all these young actors but I don't think there is a lot of character in them. Why they choose Madonna after she sung a theme song for Austin Powers The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999) I don't understand but they didn't stop there she has a cameo, luckily it's brief. Speaking of cameos Deborah Moore, Roger Moore's daughter has one as an airline hostess. Cuba was a real treat to me and I even liked the DNA clinic to a certain extant. The sword fighting is something we really haven't seen in a Bond film and was delightful IMO. Why does the Ice Palace need to have a ecosystem and a mine, is a ice palace not good enough? Gustav's power suit is a little much, I think they borrow a few plot points about the satellite from Bat-Man and Robin and Miranda's motivates for betraying Bond so she can win a gold medal seem thin to me. The simulator Moneypenny uses at the end of the film and Bond uses earlier in a training exercise never really bugs me although it makes no sense because of how impossible it would be. For sure some of the one liners in this film are as bad as ever like Jinx's mamma or 'Now there's a name to die for.' I enjoy all the little and not so little references and tributes used for the 40th Anniversary, 'I believe this is your 20th', 'how time fly's.' I can't stand Halle Berry and am glad she didn't get a spin-off. DAD left me wanting more Bond and more Brosnan in 2004. 


#23 hilly

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 10:55 AM

I watched The World Is Not Enough recently. It's ok and a typical "3rd" Bond film really. 

No 1 is a slightly nervous debut, with all eyes on the incumbent Bond. No.2 has a little more confidence, but people are still waiting to see if the good debut was merely a fluke. No 3 is where the new Bond has settled in and can afford to swagger a bit, the producers can breathe a sigh of relief and all concerned relax and enjoy themselves.

TWINE is no exception. It's glossy and confident. Brosnan knows he's good and that he's popular with the punters and it shows in his performance. All the requisite elements are in place, there's room for a little manouvre and fiddling with the formula ( M out of her comfort zone, MI6 relocated to Scotland) but it's a crowd pleaser. I think it sags a bit towards the end, but it's by no means a bad film.



#24 Golddragon71

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 07:44 AM

just was watching TND and something struck me.

after Bond shuts down the Power at Carver's Network Launch in Hamburg, he goes back to his hotel to wait for whoever Carver sends to deal with him. While he's waiting, Bond pulls out his PPK and attaches a silencer to it, pours a shot of Vodka and waits.

The next day Bond goes to Carver's  facility and starts snooping around. He eventually finds the GPS encoder and heads out but hears someone keying themselves in to enter the office. Bond takes out his Walther and is ready to shoot the person, but rather than stay stealthy and use the silencer again, he opts instead to fire the gun as-is and let the shot go loud. I understand why he would use the silencer in the hotel when he didn't want to disturb the other guests, but why wouldn't he use it when he's trying to sneak around a place where he's not supposed to be? granted, after way Lin's entry sets off the alarm it's a moot point anyway, but I'm still surprised he didn't make the effort to keep things quiet.



#25 DaveBond21

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 05:15 AM

[-The lack of breathing space, particularly in the second half. Clocking in at under two hours, TND is one of the shorter entries in the series, which makes its wall-to-wall action feel a bit much at times. Some more characterization scenes (like the brilliant one at Carver's launch party) would have helped elevate the film to iconic status, as these bits which are already in the film were done brilliantly.  ]

 

 

Yes, I agree with this for TND. Of course, the entire premise is that it all happens in about 48 hours and it's a race against the clock. But it would have been nice if we'd had a bit more time in Thailand, as Bond and Wai Lin get to know each other on land, before heading out in their boat.

 

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#26 David_M

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 04:14 PM

 

just was watching TND and something struck me.

after Bond shuts down the Power at Carver's Network Launch in Hamburg, he goes back to his hotel to wait for whoever Carver sends to deal with him. While he's waiting, Bond pulls out his PPK and attaches a silencer to it, pours a shot of Vodka and waits.

The next day Bond goes to Carver's  facility and starts snooping around. He eventually finds the GPS encoder and heads out but hears someone keying themselves in to enter the office. Bond takes out his Walther and is ready to shoot the person, but rather than stay stealthy and use the silencer again, he opts instead to fire the gun as-is and let the shot go loud. I understand why he would use the silencer in the hotel when he didn't want to disturb the other guests, but why wouldn't he use it when he's trying to sneak around a place where he's not supposed to be? granted, after way Lin's entry sets off the alarm it's a moot point anyway, but I'm still surprised he didn't make the effort to keep things quiet.

 

 

Because screwing on the silencer in the hotel makes for a nice Bondian image ("Look how Bond-y I am!") but the later scene is less likely to end up in a Bond retrospective book.

 

This is the same reason he fixes his tie in the GE "tank" scene.  Brosnan Bond knows he's in a movie.



#27 Mr_Wint

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 06:09 PM

just was watching TND and something struck me.

after Bond shuts down the Power at Carver's Network Launch in Hamburg, he goes back to his hotel to wait for whoever Carver sends to deal with him. While he's waiting, Bond pulls out his PPK and attaches a silencer to it, pours a shot of Vodka and waits.

The next day Bond goes to Carver's  facility and starts snooping around. He eventually finds the GPS encoder and heads out but hears someone keying themselves in to enter the office. Bond takes out his Walther and is ready to shoot the person, but rather than stay stealthy and use the silencer again, he opts instead to fire the gun as-is and let the shot go loud. I understand why he would use the silencer in the hotel when he didn't want to disturb the other guests, but why wouldn't he use it when he's trying to sneak around a place where he's not supposed to be? granted, after way Lin's entry sets off the alarm it's a moot point anyway, but I'm still surprised he didn't make the effort to keep things quiet.

 

Just pretend that he didn't have the time needed to put on a silencer...



#28 Mr. Somerset

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 10:00 PM

I miss the Brosnan era, actually. It was an event each time a new film came out and we didn't have to wait four years for the next entry.

I enjoyed TND quite a bit on a recent viewing, and it may be my favorite of his films now (although at the time I preferred GE).



#29 Tiin007

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 02:56 AM

I miss the Brosnan era, actually. It was an event each time a new film came out and we didn't have to wait four years for the next entry.

I enjoyed TND quite a bit on a recent viewing, and it may be my favorite of his films now (although at the time I preferred GE).

 

TND has definitely aged better. In fact, judging solely by technology featured in the films, TND looks like it could've been made eight years after GE. Had you listed their release dates as 1991 and 1999, respectively, I'd have believed you.

 

And don't get me started on Pierce's haircut in GE...



#30 sharpshooter

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 09:30 AM

I agree. TND is an entertaining movie and for me, it remains the highlight of Brosnan's tenure.