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Do you think Jeffrey Deaver did Bond justice?


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#91 Pam Bouvier

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 04:10 AM

I just finished Carte Blanche. For me, I the idea of reading about a modern Bond, kept me into the book. No one can beat Fleming. But, Fleming isn't coming back from the dead, so I enjoyed reading something with a different take on the character.

I liked the way Deaver incorporated many of Fleming's other character's (it's always a treat to read about Leiter, who I'd love to see more of in the films, as well as M, Tanner, and the others that have been standards since the days of Fleming).

#92 KM16

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 09:53 PM

I went into this book thinking I was absolutely going to hate it, already knowing a few details before hand (new Q, no MI6, ect ect) but I came out actually really enjoying it. I liked a lot of the new things, I like the way the new modern Bond was handled. Sure, it was no Fleming but it wasn't supposed to be, either. I appreciated what Deaver tried to do. My only complaint was the villain, he/she just lacked a little something for me. But overall I really enjoyed it and I hope, even though the next book is back in the 60's, they follow-up on this one at some point... but I won't hold my breath.

Edited by KM16, 05 September 2012 - 09:53 PM.


#93 GrinderAK

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 08:04 AM

IMHO, he did an excellent job of modernizing Bond, but still balancing tradition. The Subaru was also a nice touch.

#94 Harry Fawkes

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:29 PM

No. I honestly don't think JD's Carte Blanche did James Bond any justice at all. In fact, I think he made an absolute mess of it. I've tried to come to terms with this awful conclusion of mine (I say awful because I really wanted Carte Blanche to work) but unfortunately I can't.

 

There are a number of reasons why it doesn't 'tickle my fancy'. First and foremost I honestly think Mr. Deaver made a total hash out of the character. His background actually sucks.

 

Veteran of the Afghanistan war my….

 

Following is an extract from MI6 Home of James Bond 007 and this is what I mean (Hope MI6 doesn’t mind me reproducing it here mind) – in other words this is how Bond’s dossier should have read for optimum impact:

 

Bond served as an intelligence officer on HMS Exeter both before and during Operation Granby, and later was able to transfer to submarine service, touring on the HMS Turbulent. His natural abilities, mental quickness and confidence impressed his commanding officers. Within the year of being assigned to HMS Turbulent, it became apparent that Bond was not being sufficiently challenged with his duties. Bond volunteered for Special Boat Service.

 

Bond excelled at SC3 and Underwater and Aquatic Warfare training. He constantly equalled or bested his superior officers and instructors in all areas after nominal experience. Bond earned the distinction of being the only candidate to entirely escape detection during the night limpet placement operation at Plymouth. There was some doubt as to whether Bond had actually accomplished the mission per the assignment until he demonstrated his rather ingenious method of eluding the underwater infra-red cameras and sonar systems in-place. His techniques were rapidly included in future training.

 

Upon completion of UAW training, Bond commenced Advanced Commando Parachute training at Brize Norton. Attached is a report from his instructor (name omitted):

            Lieutenant Bond participated in the first group freefall exercise today, where the following incident occurred: At 700 m. 3 rd jumper Lt. Cameron' s ripcord pin sheared, and he panicked. 4 th jumper Lt. Bond spotted Cameron, and at great personal risk, repositioned himself to aerially intercept Lt. Cameron at approx. 300m, and deploy Lt. Cameron' s chute. Lt. Bond deployed at 150 m. Lt. Cameron shattered his hip upon landing, although Lt. Bond escaped without serious injury.           

 

Bond' s record with training earned him placement with the 030 Special Forces Unit, rather than deployment as a swimmer-canoeist with the standard SBS Units in Poole. During further training with 030 SFU, Bond earned certifications for the operation of assault helicopters, Harrier-class jets, fixed wing aircraft, hovercrafts, marine assault vessels, armored vehicles, and other crafts.

 

Bond served with distinction in the 030 Special Forces Unit. He proved adept at training other candidates, initiating athletic competitions, and fostering a creative environment. During his three-year tenure with the 030 SFU, Cmd. Bond rose to the rank of Lieutenant Commander. He saw covert service in Iraq, Somalia, Iran, Libya, and active service in Bosnia. Upon completion of his duties in Bosnia- where Bond was credited with saving the lives of nearly 100 men from a Serbian militia in one village- Bond was recruited by the RNR Defence Intelligence Group and awarded the rank of Commander.

 

Cmd. Bond' s work with the Defence Intelligence Group at Defence Intelligence and Security Centre, Chicksands, proved highly satisfactory, although his fellow officers noted Bond' s rather casual attitude toward command structure and protocol. Cmd. Bond' s work provided vital intelligence during key moments with Libya, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Cyprus, Indonesia, China (during the Hong Kong handover) and North Korea. In Libya, Bond was able to secure detailed assessments of the status of the Libyan government' s reputed financial ties to numerous terrorist organizations, as well as crucial information related to the settlement of issues related to the Pan Am 103 case. In Iraq, Cmd. Bond was able to monitor Iraqi counter-moves to the UNSCOM (now UNMOVIC) inspections process during one key period. Cmd. Bond undertook a particularly hazardous mission into Afghanistan to rescue a researcher deemed important to Her Majesty' s government who was being imprisoned by the Taliban government. During the S-300 missile crisis in Cyprus, Cmd. Bond helped undermine the Republic of Cyprus government' s confidence, and, it is felt, helped bring a peaceful resolution to the matter. During his tenure at the DI Group RNR, Bond attended specialized courses at Cambridge (where he achieved a first in Oriental Languages), Oxford and other institutions. Bond left the DI Group RNR after recruitment by the MI6.

 

Now this Bond’s background would be more to the truth, I’m sure you agree rather than what Mr. Deaver feebly comes up with for his James Bond.  

 

My opinion regarding Carte  Blanche therefore does not, mind, derive because I'm not up for new twists, or because I'm too 'stuck in the past' as some friends have pointed out.

 

Far from it.

 

I loved what the producers of Casino Royal did in rebooting the film series and the character of James Bond - but what Deaver does is what I can only call an unqualified aberration.

 

And I think it all boils down to his failure to find a balance between reinventing Mr. Bond for the 21st century and retaining the deep 'characteristics' that, in my opinion of course, make James Bond uniquely James Bond – something which, as I said earlier, the films succeeded in doing beautifully with Craig in the role and the story route they boldly took.

 

Oh yeah, and before I forget, as for the new organisation known as the Overseas Development Group, modelled upon WW2's the Special Operations Executive, and supposedly reinvented to counter post-9/11 threats, as much as the author tries, he fails miserably in this department too, to make matters worse for me!

 

Come on!

 

The author has no bloody idea whatsoever what the hell he is writing about here. Oh, he might have convinced the uninitiated that what he was writing about was at least a fair plausibility regarding such an ultra-secret entity , but to those of us with just a tincy tiny background into the world of cloak and daggers or even matters where the 'defence of the realm' is concerned, what he writes about the ODG is pathetically dis-attached from what an actual British organisation such as that would actually (Ectuuaally) be like or how, even, such an organisation would function at home.

 

Believe me, Mr Deaver gives us an 'Americanised' version of what a British special operation's unit like the OO Section would be like.

 

Licence to kill?

 

Absolutely note thank you very much.

 

Carte Blanche, Monsieur Bond?

 

Not likely. Your hands are bound. Kid gloves is the word and ‘By any means necessary’ simply means it sound good but don’t take it seriously.

 

Make sense?

 

Hmmmm, perhaps.

 

 

Complicated?

 

Look at it this way: Ian Fleming was so convincing about the OO Section because he knew what he was writing about, to an extent of course. In other words he knew what is referred to as the 'intricate machinations' of such an organisation and what they were all about even though the OO Section was simply a figment of his imagination

 

(or was/is it?).

 

Ok, enough already. Ultimately, Mr. Deaver does deliver a fantastic twisting tale with exciting spirit and style though, I'll give him that.

 

The reader is kept on the edge till the very last page (10 out of 10 there) – but, does that qualify it as a bloody good Bond book.

 

Once again no.

 

I feel that as a homage and/or reboot (call it what the heck you want) of Bond's world and everything that ultimately counts in this particular reader's own ‘book’ left absolutely too much to be desired.

 

Sorry.



#95 seawolfnyy

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:27 AM

Eh, I'm more or less indifferent towards Carte Blanche. But it's been over a year since I read it, so maybe I need to give it another shot. I remember having the same thoughts about it that I did about Devil May Care after reading it. There was nothing memorable about it. It was a good and easy read, but nothing more. I honestly don't remember much, I'll have to give it another go.



#96 The Shark

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 12:07 PM

Deaver ruined the character of Bond.



#97 volante

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 03:58 PM

I think as a novel its not one of Deaver's best efforts; I'd rather read "The bodies left behind" before going back to CB



#98 Hansen

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 04:32 PM

I barely remember it. A sure miss, then.



#99 smudge76

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:43 PM

No. I honestly don't think JD's Carte Blanche did James Bond any justice at all. In fact, I think he made an absolute mess of it. I've tried to come to terms with this awful conclusion of mine (I say awful because I really wanted Carte Blanche to work) but unfortunately I can't.

 

There are a number of reasons why it doesn't 'tickle my fancy'. First and foremost I honestly think Mr. Deaver made a total hash out of the character. His background actually sucks.

 

Veteran of the Afghanistan war my….

 

Following is an extract from MI6 Home of James Bond 007 and this is what I mean (Hope MI6 doesn’t mind me reproducing it here mind) – in other words this is how Bond’s dossier should have read for optimum impact:

 

Bond served as an intelligence officer on HMS Exeter both before and during Operation Granby, and later was able to transfer to submarine service, touring on the HMS Turbulent. His natural abilities, mental quickness and confidence impressed his commanding officers. Within the year of being assigned to HMS Turbulent, it became apparent that Bond was not being sufficiently challenged with his duties. Bond volunteered for Special Boat Service.

 

Bond excelled at SC3 and Underwater and Aquatic Warfare training. He constantly equalled or bested his superior officers and instructors in all areas after nominal experience. Bond earned the distinction of being the only candidate to entirely escape detection during the night limpet placement operation at Plymouth. There was some doubt as to whether Bond had actually accomplished the mission per the assignment until he demonstrated his rather ingenious method of eluding the underwater infra-red cameras and sonar systems in-place. His techniques were rapidly included in future training.

 

Upon completion of UAW training, Bond commenced Advanced Commando Parachute training at Brize Norton. Attached is a report from his instructor (name omitted):

            Lieutenant Bond participated in the first group freefall exercise today, where the following incident occurred: At 700 m. 3 rd jumper Lt. Cameron' s ripcord pin sheared, and he panicked. 4 th jumper Lt. Bond spotted Cameron, and at great personal risk, repositioned himself to aerially intercept Lt. Cameron at approx. 300m, and deploy Lt. Cameron' s chute. Lt. Bond deployed at 150 m. Lt. Cameron shattered his hip upon landing, although Lt. Bond escaped without serious injury.           

 

Bond' s record with training earned him placement with the 030 Special Forces Unit, rather than deployment as a swimmer-canoeist with the standard SBS Units in Poole. During further training with 030 SFU, Bond earned certifications for the operation of assault helicopters, Harrier-class jets, fixed wing aircraft, hovercrafts, marine assault vessels, armored vehicles, and other crafts.

 

Bond served with distinction in the 030 Special Forces Unit. He proved adept at training other candidates, initiating athletic competitions, and fostering a creative environment. During his three-year tenure with the 030 SFU, Cmd. Bond rose to the rank of Lieutenant Commander. He saw covert service in Iraq, Somalia, Iran, Libya, and active service in Bosnia. Upon completion of his duties in Bosnia- where Bond was credited with saving the lives of nearly 100 men from a Serbian militia in one village- Bond was recruited by the RNR Defence Intelligence Group and awarded the rank of Commander.

 

Cmd. Bond' s work with the Defence Intelligence Group at Defence Intelligence and Security Centre, Chicksands, proved highly satisfactory, although his fellow officers noted Bond' s rather casual attitude toward command structure and protocol. Cmd. Bond' s work provided vital intelligence during key moments with Libya, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Cyprus, Indonesia, China (during the Hong Kong handover) and North Korea. In Libya, Bond was able to secure detailed assessments of the status of the Libyan government' s reputed financial ties to numerous terrorist organizations, as well as crucial information related to the settlement of issues related to the Pan Am 103 case. In Iraq, Cmd. Bond was able to monitor Iraqi counter-moves to the UNSCOM (now UNMOVIC) inspections process during one key period. Cmd. Bond undertook a particularly hazardous mission into Afghanistan to rescue a researcher deemed important to Her Majesty' s government who was being imprisoned by the Taliban government. During the S-300 missile crisis in Cyprus, Cmd. Bond helped undermine the Republic of Cyprus government' s confidence, and, it is felt, helped bring a peaceful resolution to the matter. During his tenure at the DI Group RNR, Bond attended specialized courses at Cambridge (where he achieved a first in Oriental Languages), Oxford and other institutions. Bond left the DI Group RNR after recruitment by the MI6.

 

Now this Bond’s background would be more to the truth, I’m sure you agree rather than what Mr. Deaver feebly comes up with for his James Bond.  

 

My opinion regarding Carte  Blanche therefore does not, mind, derive because I'm not up for new twists, or because I'm too 'stuck in the past' as some friends have pointed out.

 

Far from it.

 

I loved what the producers of Casino Royal did in rebooting the film series and the character of James Bond - but what Deaver does is what I can only call an unqualified aberration.

 

And I think it all boils down to his failure to find a balance between reinventing Mr. Bond for the 21st century and retaining the deep 'characteristics' that, in my opinion of course, make James Bond uniquely James Bond – something which, as I said earlier, the films succeeded in doing beautifully with Craig in the role and the story route they boldly took.

 

Oh yeah, and before I forget, as for the new organisation known as the Overseas Development Group, modelled upon WW2's the Special Operations Executive, and supposedly reinvented to counter post-9/11 threats, as much as the author tries, he fails miserably in this department too, to make matters worse for me!

 

Come on!

 

The author has no bloody idea whatsoever what the hell he is writing about here. Oh, he might have convinced the uninitiated that what he was writing about was at least a fair plausibility regarding such an ultra-secret entity , but to those of us with just a tincy tiny background into the world of cloak and daggers or even matters where the 'defence of the realm' is concerned, what he writes about the ODG is pathetically dis-attached from what an actual British organisation such as that would actually (Ectuuaally) be like or how, even, such an organisation would function at home.

 

Believe me, Mr Deaver gives us an 'Americanised' version of what a British special operation's unit like the OO Section would be like.

 

Licence to kill?

 

Absolutely note thank you very much.

 

Carte Blanche, Monsieur Bond?

 

Not likely. Your hands are bound. Kid gloves is the word and ‘By any means necessary’ simply means it sound good but don’t take it seriously.

 

Make sense?

 

Hmmmm, perhaps.

 

 

Complicated?

 

Look at it this way: Ian Fleming was so convincing about the OO Section because he knew what he was writing about, to an extent of course. In other words he knew what is referred to as the 'intricate machinations' of such an organisation and what they were all about even though the OO Section was simply a figment of his imagination

 

(or was/is it?).

 

Ok, enough already. Ultimately, Mr. Deaver does deliver a fantastic twisting tale with exciting spirit and style though, I'll give him that.

 

The reader is kept on the edge till the very last page (10 out of 10 there) – but, does that qualify it as a bloody good Bond book.

 

Once again no.

 

I feel that as a homage and/or reboot (call it what the heck you want) of Bond's world and everything that ultimately counts in this particular reader's own ‘book’ left absolutely too much to be desired.

 

Sorry.

Everything above is correct and i have said the same before. I will now go as far to say its one of the worst and deaver obviously did not speak to the correct people in regards research into such a unit. I have been on ground both asa PMC and Military psd and what he writes is rubbish very slap dash.



#100 SecretAgentFan

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 12:01 PM

Neither did he, nor Mr. Faulks.  While Deaver tried to reimagine Bond and de-bonded him too much, Faulks loaded his book with too much Bond. Deaver turned it into a Bourne-like, run-of-the-mill thriller, Faulks into a parody.  The problem is: both authors thought they really understood Bond.

 

Looking forward to Mr. Boyd´s effort.



#101 hcmv007

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 03:58 PM

I loved Carte Blanche and would like to see a follow up. Still I agree with what has been said about Bond's actions, he was too reserved. He could've done something like smack a woman's butt in a playful manner (like in Goldfinger), or make a lewd comment or two.Still I liked the plot and story was good. Hopefully a new book will be written that picks up on the dangling plot left at the end of the book involving Steel Cartridge



#102 TheREAL008

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 05:56 PM

Given that Mr. Boyd has also mishandled and misrepresented Bond, I'd say it's time to forgo any other previous settings and just concentrate on the present day. Comparing Carte Blanche to Solo, CB wins out because it's more Bondian than Solo could ever hope to achieve to be. Perhaps it's too much of a spy novel and not enough of a Bond novel for some, however I'll take that over the slop that Boyd has given us.



#103 OmarB

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:38 PM

I also prefer what Deaver did.  I wanted to write a review in the other thread for Solo but by the time I finished it I just didnt care.  I was bad, so bad I didnt want to spend the couple moments composing thoughts on all I thought was wrong with it.  Deaver's Bond had a nice pace, it moved like a thriller should.  Boyd felt the need to have Bond eating or drinking in every other scene.  He was not vital, all I saw was an old man who wanted nothing more than to sit and get plastered while the story happened around him.  Deaver's Bond was the story.  I said it back when CB was released and I will say it again, Project X must live on.



#104 Jim

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 06:15 AM

Boyd felt the need to have Bond eating or drinking in every other scene.  He was not vital, all I saw was an old man who wanted nothing more than to sit and get plastered while the story happened around him.  

 

Whatever Solo's other weaknesses, I suspect that was the point.



#105 OmarB

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:59 PM

 

Boyd felt the need to have Bond eating or drinking in every other scene.  He was not vital, all I saw was an old man who wanted nothing more than to sit and get plastered while the story happened around him.  

 

Whatever Solo's other weaknesses, I suspect that was the point.

 

 

Then Boyd does not understand the character.  He is a strong, vital individual.  He has his bouts of melancholy, but they are controlled ... like Conan.  Gardner had him still had him as a man of action, smoking and drinking less, constantly training.  



#106 S K Y F A L L

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 03:32 AM

Anyway I just finished it and am still taking it all in, just a few thoughts came to mind. 

 

Wasn't what I was quit expecting though I'm not sure what I was expecting. I liked his back story and the subplot however wasn't really into the main plot. I didn't really like any of Bond and Felix's or Tanner's dialog together although I was pleased to have Goodnight in the novel. Some of the name drops were interesting but some where also off putting to me, for example I think he mentions the Bourne series. I didn't really care much for the villain either. Being in Dubia kind of reminded me of Mission Impossible IV when they kept mentioning the Burj Khalifa but I was pleased they also mention the Burj Al Arab which looks like a sail..



#107 seawolfnyy

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 02:19 PM

Carte Blanche was just an unfortunate miss. I think had IFP continued with this new contemporary timelines (with or without Deaver), I think Carte Blanche could've been a could jumpstart for a series. However, the novel (as with all of the contemporary set Bond continuation novels) never feels like a Bond novel. It feels too much like a movie.






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