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Name who should write the new 007 novel


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#61 Skylla

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 09:24 PM

the French novelist Gérard de Villiers

I don´t think he has left much to say after 138 books about Prinz Malko Linge :-) 



#62 Skylla

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 09:31 PM

Yeah Clive Cussler would really do a good job.

I thought he already did with the novel Night Probe. Put your favorite ex-Bond-actor as the british agent in the book....



#63 saint mark

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 10:47 PM

 

the French novelist Gérard de Villiers

I don´t think he has left much to say after 138 books about Prinz Malko Linge :-) 

 

I would not mind however. ;)

 

His Bond in Africa would have been far more interesting me thinks.



#64 Randy Wiggins

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 11:00 PM

I would NOT want a Bond novel written by a woman. I did NOT read the Moneypenny diaries and will NOT accept a woman writing Bond in any way shape or form. While women are fine at writing their little romantic suspense and other girl books, women have no business writing Bond. They are eye candy and filler for Bond to play around with and that is all they are good for.

 

Randy



#65 Jim

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 05:04 AM

I would NOT want a Bond novel written by a woman. I did NOT read the Moneypenny diaries and will NOT accept a woman writing Bond in any way shape or form. While women are fine at writing their little romantic suspense and other girl books, women have no business writing Bond. They are eye candy and filler for Bond to play around with and that is all they are good for.
 
Randy


...?

#66 Odd Jobbies

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 11:22 AM

I would NOT want a Bond novel written by a woman. I did NOT read the Moneypenny diaries and will NOT accept a woman writing Bond in any way shape or form. While women are fine at writing their little romantic suspense and other girl books, women have no business writing Bond. They are eye candy and filler for Bond to play around with and that is all they are good for.

 

Randy

Guess you never heard of Agatha Christie, then... She writes obscure little mystery thrillers that not many people have heard of   ;)

 

Margaret Atwood might be interesting - she'd render the dystopian misogynistic atmosphere of Fleming's cold war paranoiac world in which the men and women are damaged play-things of the the state and the criminal syndicates that oppose it.

 

I do like the idea of Robert Harris - his FATHERLAND protagonist had a tangible, fallible inner life, while remaining essentially heroic - very important to Fleming's Bond. I haven't read the others, but the movie/tv adaptions of Enigma, Archangel, and particularly The Ghost bode well for Bond IMO - seems a good fit!

 

I know we're not talking about directors here, but Polanski's adaptation of The Ghost makes me really wanna see his Bond - he's better suited than any director who's ever lived to realizing Fleming's twisted, sadistic psycho-sexual tone. Polanski's characterization of Bond, the woman and the villain and their complex relationship would be sublime.... Sorry about derailing the thread a little there :)

 

Another Harris - not sure i really want him to write Bond, but he'd certainly pen a memorable villain - Thomas Harris, creator of Hannibal Lector...


Edited by Odd Jobbies, 12 October 2013 - 11:24 AM.


#67 saint mark

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 11:29 AM

Polanski is a NO GO as far as the big US finaciers are concerned, due to his unpunished misdeeds some decennia ago.



#68 ChickenStu

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 12:49 PM

Lee Child? 

 

I've only ever read one Jack Reacher adventure and that was One Shot. On the strength of that I think he could probably do a decent one. I think I read somewhere he was offered the opportunity to do so, but turned it down. I hope one day they approach him again and he reconsiders. 

 

I have literary ambitions myself, and have this dream that one day I'll be an author and have the opportunity to take a crack at one of these. I've got an idea for a story where an ageing Bond is in Berlin on the night the wall comes down, and gets involved in a massive conspiracy that could ruin it all. He must race against time to stop "the Cold War getting hot again!"

 

Although one of you guys will probably tell me it's already been done and ruin my life... lol. 



#69 Odd Jobbies

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 02:20 PM

Polanski is a NO GO as far as the big US finaciers are concerned, due to his unpunished misdeeds some decennia ago.

No, indeed, i realise this. Even if he was cleared i don't see Eon going this route - Polanski makes serious thrillers and dramas, not action movies. Mendes does a grand job balancing the two - probably the best yet in this regard.

 

It was just a little fantasy football for my own titillation really. If, in fantasy land, it did happen, it would yield the most Fleminesque Bond by a far stretch.


Edited by Odd Jobbies, 12 October 2013 - 02:21 PM.


#70 Skylla

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 02:38 PM

 

 

the French novelist Gérard de Villiers

I don´t think he has left much to say after 138 books about Prinz Malko Linge :-) 

 

I would not mind however. ;)

 

His Bond in Africa would have been far more interesting me thinks.

 

I second that. Having read all Malko´s, I have to say that he became very formularic. I really loved how Villiers always wrote his book around real news and politics, very interesting to read, especially when the missions were in Africa or Asia. Btw, Jones and Brabeck were some of the funniest sidekicks ever written with their phobies about food, water, sex and everything not from America.   



#71 The Shark

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 03:15 PM

Jeremy Duns. Long overdue.



#72 Guy Haines

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 12:38 AM

I'm not so much concerned about who writes future Bond novels, but I would like to see future authors do what Ian Fleming for the most part did, and pit Bond against a clearly defined adversary from the outset. With some exceptions this has been the weakness of the continuation novels - it is as if the authors thought it would be following Fleming too closely to have Bond take on a specific enemy from the start and follow through until he has defeated him, so instead the plot lines have taken the reader down one direction, only to discover that the big bad guy wasn't the big bad guy at all (Jeffrey Deaver's Carte Blanche being an example - the wealthy villain with the odd fixation, the sinister henchman, but neither were really the driving force behind the sinister plot.)

 

Villainy has been a weakness of these post Fleming novels. Ian Fleming would often take a chapter just to inform the reader about Bond's latest adversary - either the author describing the villain, or the villain telling his own story to Bond. Whereas, in the new novel "Solo" we know little about Kobus Breed beyond a brief bit about his military service in Rhodesia, his facial disfigurement, and his gruesome method of dispatching his enemies.



#73 glidrose

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 07:50 PM

Excellent points, GH. As the saying goes, the stronger the villain the stronger the story.



#74 tdalton

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 10:28 PM

Excellent points, GH. As the saying goes, the stronger the villain the stronger the story.

 

Exactly, and something that's been inexplicably ignored by the last couple of continuation authors.



#75 SecretAgentFan

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 04:54 AM

That´s why COLONEL SUN worked for me.



#76 Jim

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 03:28 PM

the French novelist Gérard de Villiers

 

Sadly, not.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...europe-24775792



#77 Dustin

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 03:50 PM

R.I.P.

Astonished to learn he was still working until recently.

#78 saint mark

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 08:36 PM

 

the French novelist Gérard de Villiers

 

Sadly, not.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...europe-24775792

 

 

I was sadly surprised by his demise, may he rest in peace.



#79 Double Naught spy

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 11:46 PM

No matter who pens them, I confess that as long as they keep printing them,  I'll keep buying them!    (That is, as long as it is MY 007 and not the 'reimagined' imposter from Carte Blanche - Talk about 'reinventing the wheel' by creating a square block!)






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